After, Bathrooms

Upstairs part 2 – Hall bathroom

The plan below, takes one weird, poorly planned bathroom, and creates two separate bathrooms, with two very different identities.  A full bath in the hall for guests (or children of future owners), and master bedroom/ bathroom suite and balcony (with railings).  The hall bath is the lower part of the second drawing.

As we found it

As we found it

This is the revised floor plan for the bathrooms

What we did with it

Stylewise, I wanted the hall bathroom to be close historically to the time the house was built in 1904.   I found a great book  Bungalow Bathrooms, which became my bible for the design of that room.  It is a great history of bathrooms and plumbing, which sounds completely weird, but it is entertaining, and informative.

So, I came up with a general early 20th century style, leaning toward the 1930s.  I found these light fixtures from Rejuvenation.com.

lights

I love that they are porcelain,  not plastic, with cool white glass skyscraper shades.  Very Art Deco.  So Art Deco became the theme.  No bathroom vanity, but a pedestal sink.  A strong color for the walls,  small hexagonal tiles for the floor.  Vintage inspired medicine cabinet.   I wanted subway tile on the walls,  but something more interesting than plain white throughout the room.    I had seen some very cool little border tiles with fish or flowers or geometric designs in the book, but found very few in modern tile stores.  We came up with a black beaded border pencil tile, and a top chair rail style tile in black to finish off the tile wainscot.

halltile

I forgot to mention what we did with the reclaimed window.

before

 I didn’t want a clear window in the shower, duh!   I thought stained glass  would be cool.  I found an artist on Etsy in Grand Junction Colorado.  I liked a lot of their designs, and was able to have them custom make one for my bathroom.  I wanted the window to be functional.  So it became a fixed stained glass panel for the bottom two-thirds of the space, and a functional hinged window in the top third.  Building code dictates that windows in a bathroom renovation need to be tempered glass, so the stained glass was sandwiched between two pieces of tempered glass.  Here is the finished result.

stainedglass

Unfortunately the photo doesn’t do it justice.  It is just gorgeous.  There is a lovely rosey purple color in the moon, that I picked out for the walls.

The floor needed something other than white hexagon tiles.  I saw lots of designs and decided I wanted a  border design in black with random black hexagons throughout.  Almost like there was a rug there.  Here is what it ended up looking like.

hallfloor

Here is a close up showing the hex and square tiles used in the floor

floor

We had space leftover at the end of the tub, where my contractor built a shelf / bench and some recessed boxes for shampoo and stuff.

shelf

So – with the stained glass window, the pedestal sink, the black toilet seat and lid, the subway wall  tile and hex floor tile, my lovely art deco style bathroom took shape, and I couldn’t be happier with the result.

The finishing touch – we installed a cute little original light fixture on the ceiling, that was hanging in one of the bedrooms.

vintagelight

Here is a list of what we did:

  • Closed  the opening to other room, and installed a vintage looking, new  pedestal sink creating a complete bathroom
  • Removed the ceiling lowering arch above the tub, and uninspiring wall and floor tiles
  • Replaced the old shallow painted bathtub with a beautiful, deep, Kohler cast iron porcelain tub with nice period  details
  • Replaced the toilet with a newer, nicer, more efficient one that matches the style
  • Installed subway tile with black pencil  border and top cap to enhance the art deco look
  • Uncovered the window, allowing natural light and fresh Colorado air to come into the room
  • Created a lovely tile rug design on the floor.  The tile, I learned, is made by the same company that has made it for over 100 years.
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